Violation tickets can have a significant impact on your insurance rates and your ability to drive. If you need a clean driver’s abstract for your job, they could also affect your employment. Sarah knows how important a clean driving record is. 

Sarah has experience disputing and defending a wide range of violation tickets. She has handled tickets including, but not limited to, speeding, excessive speeding, distracted driving, driving without consideration and driving without due care and attention. Sarah has represented clients who were involved in serious motor vehicle collisions, and clients who were accused of stunt driving. Sarah has had success in defending all kinds of tickets in jurisdictions including, but not limited to, Vancouver, Richmond, Chilliwack, Abbotsford, Port Coquitlam, Penticton and Kelowna.

 
 
 
 

 
 

 

From My Clients

 

“Sarah is very professional and went above and beyond the call to help me solve my traffic law troubles. I couldn’t be more pleased with our communication and the results of my case. I will be recommending Sarah Leamon to my friends in need and I already have! Thanks again!!!”

 

“Highly recommend her. She helped me with my case and did an awesome job!”

 

 
 

 
 

Sarah knows how to best approach your case to get the best result possible in your circumstances. She collaborates with other professionals, like forensic consultants, to give you the best representation possible. She is a skilful negotiator and has years of court room experience. Sarah has the tools to succeed. She understands her clients’ needs and knows how to properly represent them in court. 

Before representing yourself on a traffic matter, give Sarah a call to discuss your options. 

 
 
 

FAQs

 

Should I dispute my violation ticket?

Yes. You have a right to dispute your ticket. You should dispute your ticket if you don’t think you should have been given the ticket, if you don’t agree with the fine amount or if you want more time to pay your ticket. There is no real downside to disputing a ticket for any of these reasons.

 

How do I dispute my violation ticket?

There are a number of ways to dispute your ticket. You can do so by mail. You will need to enclose a copy of your ticket and include personal information, such as your name, address, date of birth and driver’s license number. You will also need to enclose the violation ticket number and the date of the alleged offence, in addition to the act under which it was issued and the section number of the charges as listed on the ticket itself. You can also dispute your ticket in person at any ServiceBC office, ICBC Drivers Licensing or Claims Center, Autoplan broker office or court registry.

 

Is there a fee for disputing my violation ticket?

No. 

 

How long do I have to dispute my violation ticket?

You have thirty days to dispute your ticket.

 

I missed my thirty day window to dispute my ticket, is there anything that can be done?

Yes. If you missed your thirty day dispute window through no fault of your own, you can still try to dispute your ticket by filing an affidavit at the court registry. The affidavit can be found online or picked up from any registry location. However, you should be aware that your affidavit could be rejected. 

 

What happens if I do not pay my ticket and do not dispute my ticket?

The offence will be added to your driving record and the fine amount will be registered against you.

 

When will my trial date be?

It depends on where you received your violation ticket, and how busy the courts are in your jurisdiction. It is not unusual for a court date to be scheduled up to one year after the offence date. 

 

Will the infraction show up on my driving record while I am waiting for the trial date?

No.

 

What happens on my trial date?

You must attend court on your trial date. When you arrive at court, you can expect to see police officers standing outside your assigned court room. You should find the police officer who issued you your ticket. Sometimes, the officer will be willing to speak with you prior to entering into the court room. They may even give you a range of options as to what to do next. You can ask the officer to review their notes in order to see the evidence that they have against you. If you wish to plead guilty to your ticket, you may do so upon entering the court room. If you want to proceed to trial, you will need to let the officer know. You will proceed to trial that day, so long as court time permits.

 

What happens if I miss my trial date?

If you do not attend court on your trial date, then the ticket will be treated as undisputed. It will be added to your driving record. If this occurs, and you have a legitimate reason for being unable to attend, you may have your conviction reversed and a new trial date ordered. However, there is limited time to do this and you should speak to a lawyer right away. 

 

Can I adjourn my trial date?

If you are unable to attend your trial date, can apply to adjourn it in writing, so long as you do so well in advance of your hearing. You will get a response as to whether or not your application was successful in the mail. You can also apply to adjourn your trial date in person, on the date of your trial. This can be risky though. The court will consider a number of factors in deciding whether or not to grant it, and there is a chance that you will not be allowed to do so.

 

I went to trial and was convicted of the offence, is there anything else I can do?

Yes, but there are time constraints on doing so. You need to act quickly. You should talk to a lawyer as soon as possible.

 

How long do violation tickets stay on my driving record?

For ICBC purposes, they remain on your record for five years.

 

How can violation tickets affect me?

Violation tickets can affect your insurance rates and even prohibit your ability to drive. Accumulating violation tickets is never a good idea, and some tickets are viewed more seriously than others. Some of the most serious tickets that you can receive are for excessive speeding, driving without due care or attention, driving without consideration and using an electronic device while driving. If you get one of these tickets, you should seriously consider disputing it before it is too late.